Our entire ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown.
Dodge the frozen giants of Canada’s Iceberg Alley
See icebergs of every hue and shape in Canada's awesome Iceberg Alley. Read more
Rise with the tide at the Bay of Fundy
Go with the flow when there world's most extreme tide happens.  Read more
Connect with Nova Scotia’s historic Mi’kmaq culture
Step (or paddle) back into a time of Canadian legend, lore and foundation. According to Mi’kmaq legend, the hero Glooscap used his great powers to transform into a giant beaver and, by slapping his tail in the sea, created the peninsula now known as Nova Scotia.   For 10,000 years, these First Nation people have lived on this land, and you can visit the Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site to learn about this Indigenous culture through current generations of Mi’kmaq people. [caption id="attachment_21211" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A traditional Mi'kmaq boat- photo courtesy of Eric le Bel.[/caption] Hear stories from spiritual leaders at Wagmatcook Culture and Heritage Centre, see ancient artefacts at the Museum of Natural History, take a tour of the largest collection of petroglyphs in North America – literally history carved in stone – documenting people, animals, hunting, fishing and, later, sailing ships, men with muskets and Christian symbols.   Join four days of family festivities at the Millbrook Pow Wow, and canoe the traditional Mi’kmaq waterway routes.   And, of course, visit Glooscap Cultural and Heritage Centre to learn about this mythical figure born from a bolt of lightning in the sand, whose name means “man from nothing”. Get going: For a Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site trip consult pc.gc.ca. [caption id="attachment_21212" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A traditional Mi'kmaq boat- photo courtesy of Eric le Bel.[/caption] Location: Kejimkujik is 197 kilometres from Halifax Stanfield International Airport. Ferries from St John in New Brunswick sail into Digby, which is 86 kilometres from Kejimkujik. “Another park that barely receives a single plaudit back home but in itself could be a fair reason to head to Canada's wild, woolly east coast.” – Craig Tansley   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Feel the rhythm at Montréal’s International Jazz Festival
Become a hep cat at one of the world's greatest music festivals. Here’s what you need out of a vacation: meet new people, experience new things and create unforgettable memories. Montréal’s International Jazz Festival could be just the ticket you’ve been looking for.   Spread out over 10 music-filled days each June to July, 3000-plus musicians from unknown up-and-comers to veteran virtuosos take to the stage for almost 650 concerts – most of them free. [caption id="attachment_20815" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Music fans enjoying the Montreal Jazz Festival[/caption] More than 2.5 million head-bobbing, finger-clicking fans swarm here each year, and in 2006 the mega-jazz festival scored a Guinness World gong for the world’s largest.   You don't even need to be a super knowledgeable jazz fan to have a great time here: just head to a gig and absorb the vibe.   Loyal buffs soak up the sonic bliss of the classic genre and the uninitiated get to sample a different world of music while rubbing shoulders with a brand new crowd.   You dig? [caption id="attachment_20816" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Revellers at the Montreal Jazz Festival.[/caption] GET GOING: Dust off your dancing shoes and book your tickets for the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal. Find out more: [www.montrealjazzfest.com]. LOCATION: While the Jazz Festival is officially hosted in the heart of Quartier des Spectacles in the eastern portion of downtown Montréal, huge swathes of the city are given over to the event, from concert halls to open streets, cafés, bars and more. Just get to Montréal and follow the tunes … [caption id="attachment_20818" align="alignnone" width="1024"] And overflowing crowd at the Montreal Jazz Festival.[/caption] “A must for music fans. The sheer number of concerts and variety of music during this 10-day festival is staggering.” – Rob McFarland   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Experience the thrill of a dog sled ride across Yukon’s frozen lakes
Glide across the frozen expanses of the Yukon powered by man's best friend. No visit to Canada is complete without experiencing the energetic thrill of an authentic ride with a sled dog team across a frozen Yukon lake.   Bred to enjoy hurtling alongside their sled teammates across icy expanses, the excited barking of huskies anticipating their next outing will greet your ears before you even see them. [caption id="attachment_20709" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Dog sledding on Annie Lake; Yukon.[/caption] Typical tours involve riding either solo or duo, but in both cases you’ll be taught how to steer up to 16 dogs as they rocket full-tilt across one of the Yukon’s beautiful frozen lakes.   With up to 80 centimetres of ice below you covered with a cool 20 centimetres of snow on top, you’ll feel exhilarated as you and your team hurtle from the expansive white bliss of a frozen lake to pull up at your log cabin where a roaring fire awaits. Get going: Mushing is best between November and March. Book a Yukon trip with Adventure World (adventureworld.com.au). Location: Yukon is in the north-west corner of Canada, bordering Alaska. Connecting flights arrive here from Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. By bus you can travel the Alaskan highway on a Greyhound. [caption id="attachment_20710" align="alignnone" width="1024"] It's all smile while dog sledding on Annie Lake; Yukon.[/caption]  “Sway your hips and move from foot to foot as your yelping, barking team of excitable dogs strain at the leash.” – Nikki Bayley   <<Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Find rustic royalty at Clayoquot Wilderness Resort
Action and beauty abounds at Clayoquot Wilderness Resort, one of Canada's most unique.  Read more
Dust off your boots for Vancouver’s incredible West Coast Trail
Stroll along a hikers paradise in British Colombia's West Coast Trail. Originally established in 1907 along Vancouver Island’s wild south-western edge to serve as a means for shipwreck survivors to travel to safety, the Dominion Lifesaving Trail was incorporated into the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve in 1973, and re-dubbed the West Coast Trail. [caption id="attachment_21020" align="alignnone" width="667"] Hikers on the West Coast trail.[/caption] These days it’s more famous as one of the best hiking trails in the world, allowing you to walk the same paths once (and still) trodden by the First Nations’ groups of the Ditidaht, Pacheedaht and Huu-ay-aht.   Stretching for 75 kilometres, you have the option of spending anywhere from four to seven nights making this iconic journey – you’ll climb ladders, make your way through forests, pass waterfalls, ford rivers and carefully navigate slopes to reach your destination. [caption id="attachment_21021" align="alignnone" width="1024"] The West Coast trail ferry arrives.[/caption] It’s an ideal trip for those who like to challenge themselves.   Guided tours off the main path are also available, taking you into a variety of First Nations’ cultural sites. [caption id="attachment_21022" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A waterfall on the West Coast trail.[/caption] For experienced hikers, Canada doesn’t get any better than this. GET GOING: The West Coast Trail (westcoasttrail.com) is accessible year-round, but its “season” is May 1 to September 30. Hikers visiting outside this period must be aware that not all facilities, including search and rescue, may be available. LOCATION: The West Coast Trail is in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve in Vancouver Island’s wild south-west, spanning 75 kilometres between Port Renfew at its southern end, and the fishing village of Bamfield to the north. The closest major cities are Port Alberni and Duncan, both of which are about two to three hours’ drive away. [caption id="attachment_21023" align="alignnone" width="1024"] One of the beautiful spots on the west Coast trail.[/caption] “Wild, pristine country – you'll feel you’re in the middle of nowhere. With beaches, lakes, rivers, tall mountains and wild rainforest, this is one of the best wilderness areas in North America.” – Craig Tansley   << Previous | Next >>  Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Go wild at the luxurious Sonora Resort in the Discovery Islands
Stay in the lap of luxury in the middle of the British Colombia wilderness.  Read more
Soar over the ice fields of Kluane National Park
Fly over one of the most striking views in Canada, if not the world.  Read more
Migrate to the Arctic north with Canadian caribou
Get amidst a giant Canadian caribou herd in the frozen Nunavut territory.  Read more
Explore 400 years of history in Old Québec
Stroll back in time, treading the streets of a city that's more than 400 years old.  Read more
Lodge in style at the Great Bear Rainforest’s Nimmo Bay Resort
Live wild, and also wildly pampered at a totally unique resort.  Read more
You’re guaranteed to be in awe of Canada’s mass reindeer migration
Watch a wildlife phenomenon like no other as the Canadian reindeer migrate. Read more
Forget the snow and follow Whistler locals to Russet Lake
Venture to an alpine lake that just begs to be plunged into. Read more
Watch an ocean become a highway in Canada, then drive it
Drive one of the world's most interesting winter roads. Read more
Heli-hiking the stunning Canadian Rockies
Hike with all the wonder, but none of the effort aboard a helicopter. Seemingly insurmountable monuments to nature’s beauty, the furthest reaches of the Canadian Rockies were once off-limits to all but the boldest of adventurers.   But now there’s an easier way to ascend and experience all this natural beauty up close: by helicopter. [caption id="attachment_20645" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Taking stock atop a Canadian mountain.[/caption] In summer and spring, world-class hotspots such as Lake Louise, Jasper and Mount Charles Stewart, represent fantastic opportunities to experience Canada’s wilderness in comfort.   You’ll see waterfalls, mountain flowers and you might even catch a glimpse of an eagle. Mountain-top picnics, ice fishing, zip lines and rock climbing are all available. Get going: [caption id="attachment_20646" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Helicopter hiking is great fun.[/caption] Sightseeing helicopter tours run year-round, but hiking-specific tours generally run mid-June to late September. Fly and hike with Canadian Mountain Holidays (canadianmountainholidays.com). Location: Take heli-hiking tours from Banff, Canmore, Lake Louise and Calgary. Trips can be as short as a few hours or up to six days, with expert guides and overnight stays in mountain lodges. [caption id="attachment_20648" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Heli hiking in Banff National Park, Alberta.[/caption] “Hiking just got sexy.” – Rob McFarland   <<Previous | Next >>  Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Ply the Inside Passage with British Columbia Ferries
Venture through the intricate waterways of British Colombia's Inside Passage. Read more
Frolic at sea with the orcas off Vancouver Island
Meet the ocean's most incredible mammal as part of a boat ride to remember. Ironically the great white whale of whale watching isn’t the white whale – it’s the elusive orca, which is actually a very large dolphin.   Sometimes (a little unfairly) known as the “killer whale”, from April to October each year the Canadian west coast boasts relatively large numbers of orca pods, and during a self-guided paddle or an organised tour from Vancouver Island, you’ll likely see orcas, dolphins, sea otters, tufted puffins, bald eagles and more. [caption id="attachment_20759" align="alignnone" width="1024"] An orca plays in the waters off Vancouver Island- photo courtesy of Shawn McCready.[/caption] What’s more, the better tours – such as those run by Orca Spirit, operating directly out of Victoria – are hosted by marine biologists who can talk you through everything you’re seeing and answer questions.   If the waters are calm enough, you may get to listen in on a hydrophone, lowered directly into the water to pick up the vocalisations of the travelling pods as they frolic and call to each other in and around the Haro Strait where the Canadian and US waters merge. GET GOING: Spot an elusive orca from April to October, when they’re at their most prevalent, with B.C.'s Coastal Adventure. For more on Vancouver Island's wildlife and nature experiences, go here. LOCATION: Vancouver Island is in the south-west corner of Canada, and Victoria, the capital of British Columbia, lies on its south-eastern tip. Near Victoria, orcas can be spotted in the Haro Strait to the east, and the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the west. [caption id="attachment_20761" align="alignnone" width="1024"] An orca waves to sightseers.[/caption] “Watching these incredibly intelligent animals hunt for salmon in the wild waters off Victoria has to be one of the best animal experiences available anywhere.” – Craig Tansley   <<Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown   var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Join the Arctic Watch on Nunavut’s untamed tundra
Go deep into the frozen reaches of Canada in Nunavut with an Arctic Watch adventure. Read more
Take a walk over the wild side for the best view in Toronto
Get on top of the world with one of Canada's best urban views.  Read more
Into icy waters: Cruising Canada’s infamous Northwest Passage
Explore the Arctic Northwest and meet giant Canadian mammals, and even bigger icebergs. Read more
Conquer Canada’s Arctic on a wilderness adventure
Take all the polar you can bear in sub-Arctic Manitoba.  Read more
Soar above the craggy peaks of Canada’s Tombstone
Soar above a stunning Canadian scene that time forgot.  Read more
Going with the floe on a Canadian polar sea adventure
Discover a whole new world near the polar north of Canada. Read more
The Canadian comfort food you need to try at least once
Indulge in a little face-stuffing in Québec, sampling a local classic. No one is positive where the original poutine – the dish or the word – comes from, but most etymological stabs involve meanings that touch on “mess”, “mixture of leftovers”, “hodgepodge” and even “bad stew”.   Regardless, only an outdoor-mad culture like Canada’s, where everyone hikes, skis or wrestles grizzlies, could develop a dish this deliciously bad for you and not have everyone slip into a carb-induced coma. [caption id="attachment_20944" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Poutine Chez: a Canadian classic[/caption] There are variations, but basically what you do is take a plate of twice-cooked French fries, cover them with fresh cheese curd then pour hot spicy gravy over the top.   The guilty pleasure of an entire nation, great poutine is served in greasy spoon diners and ski lodges across Canada.   But to sample it as close as possible to the source, Québec’s Le Chic Shack has a classique version that will see you through a long day.   If you’re stuck for time, there are more than 10 Chez Ashton fast food chains in Québec City alone with a decent poutine plate that’s plenty for two to share. [caption id="attachment_20945" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Poutine with sausage: a twist on a Canadian classic[/caption] If you’re still not done, head to one of the Cochon Dingue cafes brimming with amazing food, including, you guessed it, poutine. GET GOING: Any day, any time, you’ll find somewhere serving poutine in Québec. You’ll find plenty on Travelmarvel’s Eastern Canada and New England Cruise. LOCATION: Served all around Québec City and region, some menus are only in French, but thankfully poutine is poutine no matter what the language, so it’s incredibly easy to find.   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
How to have an epic Whistler ski day
Shred to your heart's content at one of Canada's finest ski resorts.   Read more
Watch the skies blaze from Canada’s remote Blachford Lake Lodge
Watch as the sky catches on fire at Canada's wonderful Blachford Lake Lodge.  Read more
Crack the Hermetic Code in Manitoba
Do your own super-sleuthing in one of North America's most mysterious buildings.  Read more
Peer through the glass domes of the Rocky Mountaineer
Experience one of the world's great train journeys aboard Canada's Rocky Mountaineer. Frequently named as one of the world’s great rail experiences, the Rocky Mountaineer is the most spectacular way to soak in the majestic beauty of British Columbia and the Canadian Rockies.   Winding its way along five unique routes, each trip is an unforgettable journey through some of the most varied and awe-inspiring scenery on the planet, including lush rainforests, shimmering lakes, cascading waterfalls and the snow-capped peaks of seven distinct mountain ranges.   The train travels only during the day, so you can focus on enjoying the unfolding scenery through unique glass-domed roofs.   It’s no wonder the past 25 years have seen almost two million guests peer at elk and bears, soaring bald eagles, grazing big horn sheep and more. Get going: Experience the Rocky Mountaineer (rockymountaineer.com) from April to October. Learn more with Adventure World (adventureworld.com.au). Location: There are 10 Rocky Mountaineer stations: the main HQ on Terminal Avenue in Vancouver, with one station each in North Vancouver, Kamloops, Calgary, Banff, Jasper, Lake Louise, Quesnel, Seattle and Whistler. “The most luxuriously relaxing way to slide through the Rockies.” – John Lee   <<Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Spend a storied evening in a First Nations longhouse
Go back in time with the First People in a traditional Canadian longhouse. Read more
Jam along to New Brunswick’s Jazz and Blues Festival
Tap your toes and feast your eyes at one of the world's most gorgeous music festivals.  Read more
Make merry with L’Acadie in Canada’s New Brunswick
Live, love and be merry in a festival about Acadian culture. Read more
Kiss the cod and become an honorary Canadian in Newfoundland
You made it! Now drink some grog, and kiss a fish to celebrate. Read more
For an epic RV getaway, head to the Yukon
Get on the open road under the Yukon's midnight sun. Read more
Perch yourself on the edge of the world at Fogo Island Inn
Experience hospitality that is both rugged and luxurious at Canada's Fogo Island Inn. Read more
Indulge your sweet tooth at a Canadian maple sugar shack
Let your taste buds have a holiday at a traditional Québécois sugar shack. No visit to the country that reveres the humble maple leaf so wholeheartedly is complete without a pilgrimage to a traditional “cabanes à sucre”, or sugar shack. [caption id="attachment_20846" align="alignnone" width="666"] A woman enjoys some maple syrup at a sugar shack.[/caption] The onset of spring signals the moment maple sap begins to flow in earnest, which means the annual maple syrup harvest isn’t far behind.   A uniquely Québécois tradition, the 200 or so sugar shacks still in operation throw open their doors to visitors from all over the world eager to join in the fun.   Long tables are laid and vast platters are ordered for crêpes, tarts, ham, bacon, pies, veggies . . . It’s considered extremely poor form not to cover everything in delicious maple syrup. [caption id="attachment_20847" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A sugar shake worker ladles out maple syrup.[/caption] Then, when you’re almost too full to move, head out into the chill and make your own maple taffy by dripping syrup directly onto the snow.   It’s a tradition that dates back centuries, and yet the window each year is tiny – the start of March to end of April and that’s it, so be sure you don’t miss out. GET GOING: Tuck in at a sugar shack (Québecregion.com/en/maple-sugar-shacks) from March to April. Or book an Eastern Canada, USA & Canada New England Cruise from Scenic. [caption id="attachment_20848" align="alignnone" width="652"] It's tasting time at a sugar shack.[/caption] LOCATIONS: Scattered throughout rural Québec Province, surrounding Montréal and Québec City, you’ll find tiny family-owned sugar shacks, as well are larger more commercial operations, within a comfortable driving distance. “Reaching Sucrerie de la Montagne in rural Québec takes a little effort, but it’s worth it to experience an authentic sugar-shack feast served in the middle of a maple forest.” – Katrina Lobley   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Live like a cowboy in Canada’s Grasslands National Park
Go back in time to an age where cowboys ruled the Saskatchewan plains. Read more
Why you need to catch a floatplane to Canada’s Virginia Falls
Soar your way to one of the world's great waterfalls.  Read more
Befriend a sea otter off Canada’s Vancouver Island
Meet one of the cutest Canadian critters off gorgeous Vancouver Island. Cruising quietly through glassy water to where the wild things are on a kayak tour in the shadow of mountainous Vancouver Island can be a little daunting. [caption id="attachment_21182" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Kayakers search for sea otter off Vancouver Island.[/caption] But not when your intended target is this cute.   As you glide through the sea in your lightweight craft, tentatively probing the tiny floating islands of kelp, before you know it you’ll likely find yourself surrounded by a fleet of friendly otters.   As you float along, bask in a coastline of prehistoric forests and surf-pounded beaches, secluded sea caves and alien-looking vertical rock stacks. [caption id="attachment_21181" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A sea otter pops up to say hello off Vancouver Island.[/caption] As well as the 1500 sea otters that call the area home, keep an eye out for soaring bald eagles, black bears foraging for crabs and, if you’re lucky, migrating whales.   The daily kayak routes follow the tides and weather, as well as opportunities for guests to explore the local First Nations’ culture and community. [caption id="attachment_21180" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A man looks for sea otters off Vancouver Island.[/caption] At the end of the day, you’ll be welcomed back to your Spring Island camp-base where luxury tents, gourmet meals and chats with the locals await. GET GOING: Five-day sea otter kayak tours with West Coast Expeditions (westcoastexpeditions.com) operate from late June until early September each year. Find out more here. LOCATION: Vancouver Island, BC, is off Canada’s south-west coast, and the Sea Otter Kayak Tours have their camp-base on Spring Island in the Kyuquot Sound, 150 kilometres north-west of Tofino, on Vancouver Island’s western edge. [caption id="attachment_21183" align="alignnone" width="667"] Fits stand tall on Vancouver Island.[/caption] “The evening salmon feast around the campfire is the kind of memory that lasts a lifetime – especially if there’s a sea otter or two cavorting nearby.” – John Lee   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Heli-ski your way to mountains of Canadian bliss
Heli-ski the best run of your life on a powder-filled Canadian slope.  Read more
Meet the “Magnificent 7” eco-resorts in Canada
Venture to seven Magnificent resorts that are the jewels in the Canadian eco-travel-crown. Several years ago, a group of Canadian business owners, all eco-conscious entrepreneurs and wildlife enthusiasts who’d set up shop in some of Canada’s most remote places, decided they should work together.   And so, Canada’s Magnificent 7 was established – Tweedsmuir Park Lodge, Churchill Wild, Nimmo Bay Wilderness Resort, Bella Coola Heli Sports, Siwash Lake Ranch, Clayoquot Wilderness Resort and Pacific Yellowfin – with the aim of providing truly unique exploratory experiences. [caption id="attachment_20833" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Churchill Wild Seal River Heritage Lodge.[/caption] All of these luxury wilderness lodges have become known around the world for having their own unique take on the Canadian wilderness, and visiting all of them is a rite of passage for those in the know.   Whether it’s heli-fishing, watching polar bears while on safari, staying in a luxury tent or enjoying a cruise down the coast on a private expedition boat, there’s a Magnificent 7 experience to suit your tastes. Get going: Start your journey through the Magnificent 7 (www.magnificent7.ca) and tick off as many as you can in one lifetime. [caption id="attachment_20834" align="alignnone" width="1024"] The Clayoquot Wilderness Resort.[/caption] Location: The Magnificent 7 are spread far and wide across the Canadian wilderness, so access to each of the resorts varies greatly. Your travel provider will be able to advise you on the best ways to gain access. [caption id="attachment_20836" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A walkway leading to the Siwash Resort- photo courtesy of Jeremy Koreski.[/caption] “With apologies to New Zealand, nowhere does luxury lodges quite like Canada.” – Craig Tansley   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown  var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
There’s a Canadian ice hotel that’s destroyed and rebuilt every year
Sleep in a real ice palace, alongside a frozen lake, on glassy moonlight. Although the Hotel de Glace is just a 30-minute drive from Old Town Québec, a stay there feels like being on another planet. [caption id="attachment_21264" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Ice-glass drinks are up at the ice hotel.[/caption] A winter-only structure erected using 16,000 tonnes of snow and ice, the Ice Hotel is like few others in the world in that it is utterly destroyed every spring, only to be rebuilt at the end of autumn with a new theme and new additions to the guest rooms, chapel, bar and restaurant. [caption id="attachment_21265" align="alignnone" width="666"] A guest reaches for a frozen glass at the ice hotel.[/caption] While the 2018 theme is yet to be announced in December, 2016's “time and space” motif invited guests to contemplate their perceptions of the universe while sipping cocktails in the frozen bar, or tucking themselves into warm, arctic sleeping bags atop a wooden bedspring on an ice-based bed, inside your personal ice chamber.   For guests concerned with getting cold feet, a stay here includes a mirror room at the nearby Four Points by Sheraton – but once you check in we’d be surprised if you wanted to leave the silent perpetual evening of your very own ice castle. [caption id="attachment_21266" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Guests at the ice hotel kiss in the hot tub.[/caption] Get going: Check in to the Hotel de Glace between January and March each year (hoteldeglace-canada.com). For more cool accommodation, go here. [caption id="attachment_21267" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Two guests check into their suite at the ice hotel.[/caption] Location: Hotel de Glace is just a 30-minute drive west of Québec City, on the banks of the Fossambault-sur-le-Lac. “Score bragging rights for life and bed down in a frozen palace for the night, wrapped up cosy and warm in a thermal sleeping bag on a soft bed of fur.” – Nikki Bayley   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Fill up the tank for an iconic Lake Superior road trip
Hit the road- and not just any road, but one of the most beautiful you'll find anywhere. Read more
Tundra buggy your way into Canada’s largest polar bear show
Spend a little time with an arctic giant in Canada's biggest polar bear show.  Read more
Cruise among the Palaces and Palisades of Canada’s glorious Thousand Islands
Meander back in time aboard a classic Canadian day cruise.  Read more
Go wild in Churchill on a polar bear safari
Test your nerves on a journey to meet one of the world's most amazing animals. Read more
Glide along the world’s largest skating rink in Ottawa
Get you skates on and glide along one Canada's prettiest canals. Read more
Pedalling around Vancouver’s picturesque Stanley Park
Experience one of Canada's most tranquil city parks in Vancouver. Vancouver’s Stanley Park offers myriad recreational opportunities, be it swimming off one of its pretty beaches, strolling in the botanical or Chinese gardens, marveling at the many landmarks and totems, or relaxing on one of the beautifully kept lawns. [caption id="attachment_20584" align="alignnone" width="666"] Totem poles in Stanley Park.[/caption] But the best way to experience all 400 hectares of the peninsula is atop a rented bicycle, as the park has an intricate system of purpose-built pathways – including a fringing 10-kilometre loop, ideal for running, which is around the seawall. [caption id="attachment_20585" align="alignnone" width="1024"] One of Stanley Park's lovely paths.[/caption] Offering stunning views of the city to the south, Vancouver Harbour to the east, Lions Gate Bridge and the mountains to the north and sparkling English Bay to the west, walk the entire loop in a leisurely three hours, or knock it over by bike in just over one. [caption id="attachment_20586" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Vancouver's Stanley Park from the air.[/caption] There are many opportunities to picnic, sightsee or tackle a dirt mountain-biking track. Get Going: Spokes Bicycle Rentals has been offering high-quality bikes for rent since 1938. Travel there with APT Touring. LOCATION: Close to downtown Vancouver. [caption id="attachment_20587" align="alignnone" width="1024"] MS Maasdam Cruise Ship on the St. Lawrence River.[/caption] “Join the locals in jogging around the park – a perfect cure for jetlag.” – Katrina Lobley   <<Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Beginner's guide to Canada
Canada 101: A Beginner’s Introduction
There’s a bear in there. And a moose as well. Canada is where the wild things are but there are many other reasons to explore the world’s second-biggest country.  Read more
Get your motor runnin’ with a Harley ride down Canada’s Icefields Parkway
Get hog-wild on one of the world's great motorcycle journeys. Read more
Wander among the vines of the Okanagan Valley
Enjoy and imbibe in the fertile and gorgeous Okanagan Valley. Read more
Hurtle through history aboard The Canadian
Wend your way across a great nation aboard a great Canadian train. Read more
Tiptoeing across Canada’s ancient Columbian Icefields
Ice is nice on the wonderful journey onto a centuries-old glacier. Read more
Go in search of the elusive Canadian Spirit Bear
Journey into the soul of the Canadian wilderness and meet the Spirit Bear.  Read more
Why you should make time for Banff’s Moraine Lake
Spend some time on a lake whose scenery is on the money.  Read more
Head to the roof of the world via a Canadian ice road
Drive carefully on one of the iciest (and most beautiful) roads on earth. Read more
See red salmon fill Canada’s Fraser Canyon Rapids
See one of nature's great exoduses as salmon fill Fraser Canyon Rapids. Read more
Allow your woes to float away on Canada’s Lake Louise
Relax alongside, on, or perhaps even in Canada's beautiful Lake Louise. Read more
Is Canada’s Powder Highway the best road trip in the world?
For skiers there is no road more wonderful than British Colombia's Powder Highway. If you’re a gambler, you can’t miss the Las Vegas Strip.   If you’re a fashionista, you can’t miss Rodeo Drive.   But if you’re a skier, you can’t miss Highway 95A, lovingly referred to as the Powder Highway because of the sheer density of world-class ski resorts that crouch around that one long, loose loop of bitumen carving through the Kootenay Rockies. [caption id="attachment_20841" align="alignnone" width="1500"] The gorgeous Kimberley Alpine Resort.[/caption] Clustered around the south-east corner of British Columbia, the Powder Highway encompasses a collection of eight alpine resorts.   While each is large enough to singularly host an entire holiday, there is a certain charm to a multi-destination trip.   Hitting all eight ski areas might be logistically difficult, but if you really wanted to take a crack at it, try starting at the far south-eastern point on the loop at Fernie, then track north-west to Kimberley, further north, for a few well-groomed runs at Fairmont Hot Springs with the kids. [caption id="attachment_20840" align="alignnone" width="1500"] Fun rules at Fernie Alpine Resort.[/caption] Duck west for a stop at Panorama, then continue north to Kicking Horse to practise your glade-skiing.   A curling, western arc will take you back down to Revelstoke for some extreme powder carving, then you need to gun it a long way south to reach Red Mountain and finally Whitewater, the last of the big eight, to complete the roughly 800-kilometre loop. [caption id="attachment_20839" align="alignnone" width="1500"] The sun rises over Fernie Mountain- phot courtesy of Henry Georgi.[/caption] Get going: Most resorts on the Powder Highway (powderhighway.com) will have good ski snow from late November to April. Travel there with Ski Max Holidays. Location: The Powder Highway starts about 10 hours’ drive east from Vancouver, BC, or two-and-a-half hours’ drive west from Calgary. “BC skiing isn’t only about Whistler. Join the in-the-know locals at some of the province's finest alternative resorts instead.” – John Lee   << Previous | Next >>   Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown   var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Scale the Skyline Trail in Alberta’s Jasper National Park
Venture into Canada's gorgeous Jasper National Park, following the beautiful Skyline Trail.  Read more
Saddle up for the Calgary Stampede
Channel your inner cowboy at the world famous Calgary Stampede. Read more
Go grizzly cub spotting at British Columbia’s Knight Inlet Lodge
Meet one of Canada's most gorgeous animals - the grizzly cub.  Read more
Legendary Revelstoke, also known as, heli-ski heaven
Enjoy your powder multiple ways at one of Canada's great hidden ski resorts.  Read more
Explore yourself at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Explore yourself and the nation at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. Read more
Snorkel with Canada’s mystical beluga whales
Snorkel with Canada's wonderful beluga whales.  Read more
More than a place to sleep: Canada’s iconic Fairmont hotels
Stay in a luxury Canadian Fairmont hotel, that's also a destination itself. Canada’s stunning collection of Fairmont hotels and resorts are more than just places to rest your head – they’re genuine tourist attractions in their own right.   Each holds a special place in the history of the nation, such as the Fairmont Banff Springs, opened in 1888 as Canada’s first grand railway hotel.   Without exception they are architecturally splendid, like the Edwardian era Fairmont Empress on Vancouver Island, and most take full advantage of the world’s most sought-after destinations, such as the Fairmont Château Lake Louise, a sublime 19th-century former chalet perched on an emerald-hued glacier lake in the heart of World Heritage-listed Banff National Park. [caption id="attachment_20623" align="alignnone" width="1024"] The Fairmont Lake Louise is one of the most beautiful hotels in the world.[/caption] They’ve played host to countless famous names, such as John Lennon and Yoko Ono, who recorded Give Peace a Chance at one of their famous staged Bed-Ins for Peace at Montreal’s Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth.   Winston Churchill held wartime strategy sessions with Roosevelt at the Fairmont Le Château Frontenac in Québec City in 1943.   Synonymous with luxury, steeped in history and visually breathtaking, a stay in a Fairmont goes beyond mere hospitality; it’s an experience to be treasured. [caption id="attachment_20621" align="alignnone" width="1024"] The famed John Lennon Suite, at the Fairmont Queen ELizabeth.[/caption] Locations: Fairmont Empress, Victoria   Fairmont Royal York, Toronto   Fairmont Winnipeg   Fairmont Chateau, Whistler   Fairmont Royal York, Toronto   Fairmont Le Château Frontenac, Québec City   Fairmont Château Laurier, Ottawa   Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth, Montreal   Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge   Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise   Vancouver alone is home to four Fairmont properties, with 15 more spread out across Canada. Visit fairmont.com for the full list of hotel and resort locations. [caption id="attachment_20624" align="alignnone" width="675"] The stately Fairmont Empress.[/caption] Get going: Book a historic stay at a Fairmont Hotels & Resorts property (fairmont.com) or take the Grand Tour of Canada & Alaska with Scenic (scenic.com.au).   “The perfect iconic Canadian experience.”  – Nikki Bayley   <<Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Glacier alley: Rafting down Canada’s wildest rivers
Get your heart pumping in the wilds of the Nahanni National Park Reserve. Read more
Catch your breath on British Columbia’s Sea to Sky Gondola
Ascend into heavenly views on the wonderful Sea to Sky Gondola. Read more
Bewitched by lights in remote Yellowknife
Experience one of the great natural wonders in the beautiful Canadian north. Read more
Make sure you mountain bike Alberta’s best tracks
Leave behind only tracks on Alberta's incredible mountain bike trails.   Read more
Witness the fury of a British Columbia winter from The Wick
Get in touch with Mother Nature's wild side at the windswept edge of Canada.  Read more
Fly in ultimate style to Canada’s famous Whistler
Fly over wonderful BC scenery (and many miles of traffic) as you travel from Vancouver to Whistler. Read more
Learn how to howl with wolves in Canadian wilderness
Get in touch with the dog in you while you howl at the moon.  Read more
Why you need to Hike Cape Breton’s skyline at sunset
Drink in all the natural beauty of the Cape Breton National Park.  Read more
Experience the rush of gold fever in Canada’s wild Klondike region
Travel like the settlers of yesteryear in the historic Klondike.  Read more
Drink your way back in time in ye old New France
Drink your way back in time in ye olde New France. Read more
Meet the judges behind '100 Things to do in Canada Before you Die'
Meet the judges behind ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before you Die’
We asked some of the best travel journalists in the business to help compile the ultimate list of things to see and do in Canada.   Read more
Soothe your soul by paddling Ontario’s Great Spirit Circle Trail
Get in touch with the spirits of Canada in north-eastern Ontario.  Read more
Seeking refuge: Discover the story of immigration in Canada
Learn about the story of modern Canada at the Immigration Museum at Pier 21.  Read more
Celebrate Celtic colour and culture in Cape Breton
Channel your inner William Wallace right in the middle of Canada. Read more
Feel the spray of Niagara Falls aboard Canada’s Hornblower
Experience the awesome power of one of the world's most famous waterfalls.  Read more
Go overboard for oysters on Canada’s Prince Edward Island
Taste the delicate nature of the sea itself on Prince Edward Island.   Read more
Tread the earth’s exposed mantle at Gros Morne
See the inner working's of this planet of ours at Gros Morne.  Read more
Step into the island home of Canada’s beloved Anne of Green Gables
Frolic like one of literature's favourite daughters on Prince Edward Island.  Read more
Go snorkelling with humpbacks in eastern Canada
Experience pure awe as you swim with the gentle giant of the sea.    Read more
Discover the magic of the Magdalen Islands
Discover a hidden Canadian island chain that has much to offer.  Read more
Watch amazing husky sledding at the mighty Yukon Quest
Enjoy the dog days of the Yukon Quest, watching some amazing husky sledding.  Read more
Why you need to bask under Canada’s beautiful midnight sun
Experience the beauty of perpetual daylight under Canada's midnight sun. Read more
Better than a doughnut, bite into a beavertail in Ottawa
Bite into a sweet, sticky piece of Canadian culture that you won't regret. The stunning scenery isn’t the only thing of beauty to be found in Canada.   The culinary delights on offer at Ottawa’s ByWard Market are national treasures in themselves. Located in bustling downtown Ottawa, ByWard is one of the oldest and largest farmers’ markets in Canada, cherished by locals and visitors alike. [caption id="attachment_21109" align="alignnone" width="1024"] ByWard Market, home of the legendary Beaver Tails.[/caption] It’s home to myriad iconic Canadian delicacies – with one of the standouts unquestionably a BeaverTails (no relation to the furry animal), a doughy, golden, flattish tail-shaped pastry that’s best served drenched in maple butter or covered in hazelnut Nutella. [caption id="attachment_21111" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A delicious pastry ready to be devoured- photo courtesy of Connor Turner.[/caption] Even sweeter than the pastry is the success story behind it: what began literally as a Mom-and-Pop operation at a community fair in 1978 is now an international franchise, with stores as far-flung as Japan and South Korea.   But the first bricks-and-mortar BeaverTails remains here at ByWard – a place that US President Obama made a point of visiting for a spot of takeaway on a Canadian visit in 2009.   If it’s good enough for Barack … GET GOING: Stock up on BeaverTails at Ottawa’s ByWard Market year round. Travel there on Trafalgar’s Best of Eastern Canada End Toronto. [caption id="attachment_21112" align="alignnone" width="1024"] The legendary Beaver Tails pastry show at ByWards Market.[/caption] LOCATION: ByWard Market is so big it is its own district in Lower Town, Central Ottawa. “A signature (and diet-busting) Canadian treat that will reveal your inner sweet-tooth.” – John Lee   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Go in search of Nunavut’s mystical narwhals
Meet one of world's most mystical creatures  Read more
Get insight into Inuit life in the Torngat Mountains
Have a cultural experience at one of Canada's most remote, but also most beautiful locations. It's number #29 in the 100 things to do in Canada before you die. Read more
Kick up your heels and experience the magic of Carnaval de Québec
Revel at the wonderful Carnaval de Québec, one of the world's largest outdoor festivals. Read more
Experience majestic views atop Montréal’s pretty Mont Royal
Stretch your legs and feast your eyes with a walk to the top of Mont Royal.  Read more
Dig for giant clams on Canada’s Prince Edward Island
Dine on the freshest seafood while feasting on the most gorgeous views.  Read more
Live large on lobsters on Prince Edward Island
Dine on the freshest lobster in the world on Prince Edward Island. Lobster has been shorthand for culinary luxury worldwide for the best part of 150 years – ever since well-to-do Bostonians and New Yorkers developed a taste for the meat (before that it was considered a peasant’s meal).   But have you ever wondered what life is like for the people who catch the crustaceans? [caption id="attachment_20555" align="alignnone" width="667"] Delicious lobster from the waters of Prince Edward Island.[/caption] On a Prince Edward Island lobster tour aboard owner-operator Captain Mark Jenkins’ vessel Top Notch, you’ll experience a day in the life of a fourth-generation lobster fisherman – before dropping anchor in one of the most scenic coves for a fresh lobster meal. Get going: Top Notch Tours (markscharters.com) run three times a day during PEI’s lobster season of July and August. Travel there with the PEI Landscapes of the Canadian Maritimes tour (insightvacations.com). [caption id="attachment_20556" align="alignnone" width="667"] Lobsters are pulled in on a fishing trawler.[/caption] Location: Tours leave from Charlottetown, where you’ll find Top Notch Tours at No. 2 Prince Street, on the waterfront.  “An interactive 101 introduction to lobster catching. Get your apron and sip the juice from that claw!” – John Lee   <<Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + ""; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more
Forget vegemite, feast on a smoked meat sandwich in Montréal
Open wide and get ready for one of the world's greatest sandwiches. Talk about indulging the senses.   With a deceptively simple smoked meat sandwich that could take on (and beat!) many of New York City’s finest delis, Schwartz’s in Montréal has been a local institution for nearly 90 years. [caption id="attachment_21034" align="alignnone" width="667"] The wonderful smoked meat sandwich.[/caption] You’ll rarely approach without encountering a huge line of people craving the famed beef brisket that lies within, but for the true pilgrim patience is rewarded.   Sitting shoulder to shoulder in the packed surrounds is an unforgettable way to tackle your smoked meat sandwich on rye with just the right amount of tangy yellow mustard, and, of course, a cherry coke to cut through the fat and work its magic on the saltiness of the main event. [caption id="attachment_21035" align="alignnone" width="667"] The facade of Schwartz's in Montreal.[/caption] Nothing this delicious is ever easy to come by so do your time and get in line.   You won’t regret it.   But if you are time-poor, here’s a tip: the lengthy lines are for the full dine-in experience.   If you just want to be blown away by the sandwich, skip the queue and grab one from the take-out counter next door. It’ll still taste incredible on the street. GET GOING: Fill your belly at Schwartz’s Deli (schwartzsdeli.com) from 8 ’til late. [caption id="attachment_21036" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Diners enjoy the sandwiches at Schwartz's.[/caption] LOCATION: The oldest deli in Canada, Schwartz’s can be found at 3895 Saint-Laurent Boulevard, Montréal’s cultural and culinary artery known locally as “The Main”.   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');  Read more