Canada British Columbia Victoria Holidays Attractions Inner Harbour and Fisherman's Wharf
Undiscovered Victoria city guide
Looking for somewhere new to explore?
Connect with Nova Scotia’s historic Mi’kmaq culture
Step (or paddle) back into a time of Canadian legend, lore and foundation. According to Mi’kmaq legend, the hero Glooscap used his great powers to transform into a giant beaver and, by slapping his tail in the sea, created the peninsula now known as Nova Scotia.   For 10,000 years, these First Nation people have lived on this land, and you can visit the Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site to learn about this Indigenous culture through current generations of Mi’kmaq people. [caption id="attachment_21211" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A traditional Mi'kmaq boat- photo courtesy of Eric le Bel.[/caption] Hear stories from spiritual leaders at Wagmatcook Culture and Heritage Centre, see ancient artefacts at the Museum of Natural History, take a tour of the largest collection of petroglyphs in North America – literally history carved in stone – documenting people, animals, hunting, fishing and, later, sailing ships, men with muskets and Christian symbols.   Join four days of family festivities at the Millbrook Pow Wow, and canoe the traditional Mi’kmaq waterway routes.   And, of course, visit Glooscap Cultural and Heritage Centre to learn about this mythical figure born from a bolt of lightning in the sand, whose name means “man from nothing”. Get going: For a Kejimkujik National Park and National Historic Site trip consult pc.gc.ca. [caption id="attachment_21212" align="alignnone" width="1024"] A traditional Mi'kmaq boat- photo courtesy of Eric le Bel.[/caption] Location: Kejimkujik is 197 kilometres from Halifax Stanfield International Airport. Ferries from St John in New Brunswick sail into Digby, which is 86 kilometres from Kejimkujik. “Another park that barely receives a single plaudit back home but in itself could be a fair reason to head to Canada's wild, woolly east coast.” – Craig Tansley   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');
Feel the rhythm at Montréal’s International Jazz Festival
Become a hep cat at one of the world's greatest music festivals. Here’s what you need out of a vacation: meet new people, experience new things and create unforgettable memories. Montréal’s International Jazz Festival could be just the ticket you’ve been looking for.   Spread out over 10 music-filled days each June to July, 3000-plus musicians from unknown up-and-comers to veteran virtuosos take to the stage for almost 650 concerts – most of them free. [caption id="attachment_20815" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Music fans enjoying the Montreal Jazz Festival[/caption] More than 2.5 million head-bobbing, finger-clicking fans swarm here each year, and in 2006 the mega-jazz festival scored a Guinness World gong for the world’s largest.   You don't even need to be a super knowledgeable jazz fan to have a great time here: just head to a gig and absorb the vibe.   Loyal buffs soak up the sonic bliss of the classic genre and the uninitiated get to sample a different world of music while rubbing shoulders with a brand new crowd.   You dig? [caption id="attachment_20816" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Revellers at the Montreal Jazz Festival.[/caption] GET GOING: Dust off your dancing shoes and book your tickets for the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal. Find out more: [www.montrealjazzfest.com]. LOCATION: While the Jazz Festival is officially hosted in the heart of Quartier des Spectacles in the eastern portion of downtown Montréal, huge swathes of the city are given over to the event, from concert halls to open streets, cafés, bars and more. Just get to Montréal and follow the tunes … [caption id="attachment_20818" align="alignnone" width="1024"] And overflowing crowd at the Montreal Jazz Festival.[/caption] “A must for music fans. The sheer number of concerts and variety of music during this 10-day festival is staggering.” – Rob McFarland   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');
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If you think you’re a foodie, it’s time to taste Vancouver Island
Lisa Perkovic heads to Vancouver Island and discovers how this once-sleepy region awoke to become the domain of small-scale producers that have let their taste buds run wild.
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Go from beach to brewery in BC hipster haven, Nelson
What do you get when a Canadian alpine sports hub develops a penchant for inner-city indulgences and bohemian flair? Nelson — the mini hipsterville in British Columbia’s breathtaking Kootenay Country. Writes Alissa Jenkins.
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More than beaches and peaches, Penticton has Millennial appeal
A laidback lifestyle combined with a bounty of local produce is putting retirement hub Penticton, British Columbia, in the sights of a younger market, finds Alissa Jenkins.
Plan Your West Coast Adventure
Plan your British Columbia journey with our downloadable map and itinerary
Savour the road less travelled from Canada's breathtaking west coast, through the towering fir forests and sprawling vineyards of British Columbia, across the border to Alberta's windswept prairies and pristine lakes. Our guide below will help you make it a road trip to remember.  Download and print our clickable map and itinerary here and read all our British Columbia and Alberta stories here.   DAY ONE VANCOUVER ISLAND, BC. Tip: Take a sea plane over to Victoria Harbour and set out on a discovery of small-scale producers and charming pine forests. DAY TWO VANCOUVER TO PENTICTON, BC. Tip: Before you begin your journey, spend a few days in Vancouver perusing the multitude of delights hidden within the city’s distinct neighbourhoods. DAY THREE PENTICTON TO OSOYOOS, BC. Tip: Enjoy a roadside snack at iconic ice cream parlour, Tickleberry’s. DAY FOUR OSOYOOS TO NELSON, BC. Tip: Hire an electric bike for assisted pedaling when cycling around Nelson’s stunning (but hilly) township. DAY FIVE NELSON TO AINSWORTH, BC. Tip: If visiting in August, visit nearby Kokanee Glacier Provincial Park to see the annual salmon spawning. DAY SIX AINSWORTH, BC, TO WATERTON, AB. Tip: Break up the drive by staying overnight in the picturesque ski mecca of Fernie, BC. DAY SEVEN WATERTON TO CALGARY, AB. Tip: Don’t miss one of Canada’s most underrated UNESCO sites, Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump. var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');
Le Boat Canada by canal boat holiday Rideau
Sail-yourself trip of the Canadian canals: your ultimate itinerary
Are you ready to set sail, on your terms?
Explore 400 years of history in Old Québec
Stroll back in time, treading the streets of a city that's more than 400 years old. 
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Man vs buffalo: A legacy of Alberta’s Plains People
What this gruesome UNESCO World Heritage Site lacks in international stardom, it makes up for in cultural, archeological and scientific intrigue, finds Alissa Jenkins.
Going with the floe on a Canadian polar sea adventure
Discover a whole new world near the polar north of Canada.
The Canadian comfort food you need to try at least once
Indulge in a little face-stuffing in Québec, sampling a local classic. No one is positive where the original poutine – the dish or the word – comes from, but most etymological stabs involve meanings that touch on “mess”, “mixture of leftovers”, “hodgepodge” and even “bad stew”.   Regardless, only an outdoor-mad culture like Canada’s, where everyone hikes, skis or wrestles grizzlies, could develop a dish this deliciously bad for you and not have everyone slip into a carb-induced coma. [caption id="attachment_20944" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Poutine Chez: a Canadian classic[/caption] There are variations, but basically what you do is take a plate of twice-cooked French fries, cover them with fresh cheese curd then pour hot spicy gravy over the top.   The guilty pleasure of an entire nation, great poutine is served in greasy spoon diners and ski lodges across Canada.   But to sample it as close as possible to the source, Québec’s Le Chic Shack has a classique version that will see you through a long day.   If you’re stuck for time, there are more than 10 Chez Ashton fast food chains in Québec City alone with a decent poutine plate that’s plenty for two to share. [caption id="attachment_20945" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Poutine with sausage: a twist on a Canadian classic[/caption] If you’re still not done, head to one of the Cochon Dingue cafes brimming with amazing food, including, you guessed it, poutine. GET GOING: Any day, any time, you’ll find somewhere serving poutine in Québec. You’ll find plenty on Travelmarvel’s Eastern Canada and New England Cruise. LOCATION: Served all around Québec City and region, some menus are only in French, but thankfully poutine is poutine no matter what the language, so it’s incredibly easy to find.   << Previous | Next >> Return to the ‘100 Things to do in Canada Before You Die’ countdown var axel = Math.random() + """"; var a = axel * 10000000000000; document.write('');